Monthly Archives: September 2016

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Parenting Girls for Negotiation Success in Life

Written with Harvard Professor Francesca Gino. How do we raise females to foster confidence, particularly in negotiation, by breaking cultural and societal stereotypes and leading lives and careers equally aligned with their male counterparts? Boys and girls are informed early by their parents’ behaviors, with important consequences for their future attitudes and choices. For instance, research by HBS Professor Kathleen McKin and colleagues has found that women raised by working moms end up having higher incomes than women whose moms stayed at home full time as parents serve as role models and shape their children’s expectations about gender roles. And men raised by working mums

2021-02-01T11:01:00+00:00

Success in Cross-Cultural Negotiations

[vc_row content_placement="middle"][vc_column][vc_column_text] Adapt and survive is often a key strategy in business. It turns out that it’s just as important in cross-cultural negotiations too.   This article was originally published on Procurious, based on a roundtable organised by Conti Advanced Business Learning (www.cabl.ch), a Swiss training company that specializes in Negotiation & Influencing training. This is the third article out of three.   Participants to the roundtable: Ali Atasoy, Bérénice Bessière, Thierry Blomet, Xin-jian Carlier, Giuseppe Conti, Stéphane Guelat, Jon Hatfield, Carine Kaldalian, Matthias Manegold, Laurence Pérot, Jean-Noël Puissant.   In our previous articles on cross-cultural negotiations, we had heard what our experts had to say about preparing for cross-cultural negotiations, and the importance of building relationships before negotiations even start.  

2016-09-22T15:34:38+00:00

How Women Can Demand a Higher Salary

This article was originally published in the Financial Times When I was hiring a procurement manager for my team, I asked one of the finalists what she expected to be paid. She said €65,000. I stayed silent. A few seconds later, “I can accept €62,000,” she said. After another pause, she added: “It should be no less than €60,000”. The use of silence is a negotiation tactic to get the other person to tell you the reasons for their requested salary. I did not expect that she would drop her amount twice within seconds. This experience is not unusual and there are times when women

2021-02-01T10:59:32+00:00

Building cross-cultural relationships, beyond stereotypes

[vc_row content_placement="middle"][vc_column][vc_column_text] This article was originally published on Procurious, based on a roundtable organised by Conti Advanced Business Learning (www.cabl.ch), a Swiss training company that specializes in Negotiation & Influencing training. This is the second article out of three.   Don’t assume everyone in the same culture has the same norms. Getting beyond cultural stereotypes, and seeing the individual, is key to good cross-cultural negotiation preparation.   In our previous article, we kicked off our recap of, and insight into, the intricacies of cross-cultural negotiations. In the second part of the series, our negotiation experts discuss cultural dimensions literature, the importance of moving beyond stereotypes, and why time should

2016-09-05T15:29:53+00:00

Why men and women should learn from each other to negotiate better

Is it really true, as some authors suggest, that men approach negotiation so differently to women? That men proceed with full confidence while women are often uncomfortable to the extent of avoiding the interaction/discussion?   The source of our data I recently conducted a webinar on “Overcoming Gender Bias in Salary Negotiation” with 650 participants, mainly alumni from leading Business Schools - largest groups were INSEAD alumni (22%) and London Business School alumni (15%). Although we had participants from all continents, we had a strong predominance of Europeans (64%).   As pre-work, I requested input based on the personal experience of my webinar participants. I received

2020-12-10T15:46:11+00:00
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